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LONDON
Flat 2, Ares Court, Homer Drive, Isle Of Dogs
E14 3UL London, UK
Mobile: 0044 (0)7480642265

Studio
Almanac Studio
191 Southwark Park Road,
SE16 3TX, London, UK

SICILY
Viale Tirreno n. 29
95123 Catania – Italy
+39 0957142116

Studio
Via Grimaldi n.152
95121 Catania – Italy
+39 338/2203041

e-mail: giuseppelana2 @ gmail . com

www.palazzoriso.it
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Overlooked

Overlooked
Volcanic stones, environmental installation
contrada Sciaranuova, Passopisciaro
Randazzo (CT)
2016

 

Overlooked is a site-specific installation realised in the occasion of a residency in the proximity of volcano Etna, Sicily. This is a very well-known landscape and territory for the artist, since he was born and raised in Catania; a city at the slope of the volcano. With this in mind, Lana has investigated the perception of what it is that we know, or believe to know, of a place. In this installation he particularly focused on the diverse configuration, richness and history of the territory. The goal of the project, where the role of process is key, is for the artist to confront himself with the nature of the area, his origins and familiarity with the locale, whilst highlighting the relationship between body (physical experience) and psyche (emotional involvement). By decoding Freud’s Iceberg Model for Unconscious, Pre-conscious, & Conscious, which theorises the gap between what emerges in the surface and what is instead hidden in the profundity of one’s own behaviour and mind, he has generated a dig through the stones of the volcano. This presents the viewer with a double meaning: on the one hand there is the overturning of the (Freudian) iceberg, which has inverted the representation of basis and vertex – the tip of the iceberg is now inside the rocks – and on the other there is the action of digging itself, which symbolises the stratification of history and culture. Such a deep hole, likewise a crater, has been dug on a hill made of lava stone, which was formed over decades due to the intervention of farmers. In order to free the little soil available among the volcanic rocks, these workers used to gather the stones in stacks, ultimately generating kind of monuments, which are visible until today in different areas of the volcano.